Essex County Fire and Rescue Service

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Sprinklers to be installed at three tower blocks in Essex

Sprinkler funding applications have been granted to three tower blocks in Essex, helping to keep residents safe in their homes.

Since 2013, Essex County Fire and Rescue Service has part-funded and supported the retrofitting of sprinklers in high risk premises in Essex.

The latest match-funding proposals have been agreed for sprinklers to be installed at three tower blocks in Essex at the following locations:

The University of Essex in Colchester (student accommodation/Eddington Tower) as well as Beaver Tower and Cecil Court, both residential flats in Southend owned by South Essex Homes.

South Essex Homes has been awarded £100,000 and The University of Essex was awarded £50,000 from the Fire Service’s sprinkler fund to match-fund their projects. Work to install the sprinkler systems to these three properties is hoped to begin later this year during planned refurbishment works.

Assistant Chief Fire Officer Moira Bruin said: “The planned installation of fire suppression systems demonstrates the Fire Service’s commitment to making Essex a safer place to live, work and travel.

“Sprinkler systems are an efficient and life-saving piece of equipment in preventing a developing fire, not only do they help to extinguish a fire and save lives but they can also minimise damage to homes and possessions.

“This will provide safe and secure housing for those who live in the buildings and ensure that these blocks remain safe and fit for purpose for the future years.”

Essex County Fire and Rescue Service provides a grant of up to £50,000 per sprinkler installation project to successful applicants.

Sprinklers are fitted in properties and many residents have commented how much safer they feel.

Did you know?

There is a common belief that if a fire starts in a property that has sprinklers fitted, that every sprinkler head will activate, flooding a property.

This is untrue. Individual sprinkler heads will only activate when the room temperature reaches a certain point. The heads operate as individual heat sensors – water is only released in the area where there is a fire.

In 60% of cases, fires are controlled by the spray from four sprinklers or fewer. Firefighters often use 15 times more water from hoses to do the same job as a sprinkler does alone.

For more information on the Service’s sprinkler fund click here.


Page last updated 5 August, 2020

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